Ladybower Reservoir

History
“Ladybower was built between 1935 and 1943 by the Derwent Valley Water Board to supplement the other two reservoirs in supplying the water needs of the East Midlands. It took a further two years to fill (1945). The dam differs from the Howden Reservoir and Derwent Reservoir in that it is a clay-cored earth embankment, and not a solid masonry dam. Below the dam is a cut-off trench 180 feet (55 m) deep and 6 feet (1.8 m) wide filled with concrete, stretching 500 feet (150 m) into the hills each side, to stop water leaking round the dam. The dam wall was built by Richard Baillie and Sons, a Scottish company.

The dam’s design is unusual in having two totally enclosed bellmouth overflows (locally named the “plugholes”) at the side of the wall. These are stone and of 80 feet (24 m) diameter with outlets of 15 feet (4.6 m) diameter. Each discharges via its own valve house at the base of the dam. The overflows originally had walkways around them but they were dismantled many years ago. The bell mouths are often completely out of the water and are only rarely submerged, often after heavy rainfall or flooding.”

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ladybower_Reservoir

Explored: August 2018

To see more photos as well as higher resolution photos from this explore, head over to my Flickr:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/125075228@N03/albums/72157670631126307

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